Feeling Anxious about your Dental Visit? This may be Why.

Dental anxietyDental anxiety is not a phenomenon; it is very real, and it affects a lot of people. Even though you may understand that there can be steep consequences for putting off your dental visits, you may find yourself frozen in the land of dental phobia. Here, we discuss five of the common phobias, and what you can do to make dental care an easier aspect of your healthy lifestyle.

  1. Uncertainty. We all like to know what lies ahead. Even when your visit is focused on the routine examination and cleaning of your teeth, you may feel somewhat uneasy about the potential for unnoticed problems. The way to feel more confident about potential procedures is to learn about them. Ask us! We’re happy to talk you through your questions and fears.
  2. Noisy, shiny equipment. We can understand how having sharp metal objects used in your mouth can be more than a little unnerving. Observing the dental tools we use, your mind may wonder “is this going to hurt?” In this situation, knowledge is power. Look at the dental tools. Ask us about them. With a proper explanation and understanding, you may feel much calmer about your visits.
  3. Gag reflex. We all have a gag reflex; some more than others. This can make dental visits seem daunting. Breathing through the nose can diminish the gag reflex. If this is a problem, use nasal spray prior to dental care.
  4. Nose breathing. For people who are primarily mouth-breathers, dental care can feel somewhat stifling. Like the patient with a strong gag reflex, the mouth-breather may find relief in nasal spray or strips.
  5. Needle phobia. Some people can face needles without complaint. For many of our patients, the mere thought of anesthetic injections makes them put off making that call for care. Distraction is a wonderful tool for those who are needle-phobic. We can work with you to create more ease around this aspect of care.

At Advanced Dental Arts, we do all that we can to promote positive dental experiences for our patients. Call our office at (847) 223-5200 to discuss your fears, and learn how we can help you.